The exemplars described
#1
Exemplar #1

dated 12/27/1996 on exemplar, and 12/28/1996 on cover sheet

It needs to be noted that this sample was given just ONE or TWO days after JonBenet's body was carried up from the basement and laid on the family's living room floor. Guilty or not, this woman was going through a lot.

AND, intending to be as honest as possible, I intend to point out a thing or two that I honestly thought COULD have suggested Patsy wrote the note that was never publicly discussed before. I remember wondering why those little details never came out. (And no, I am not suggesting Patsy wrote the note, there's no way her writing was a match. I am just giving an honest review of what I see).

There are only 4 pages here, one the cover page and the other a typed out copy of the "London Letter" which Patsy was clearly asked to copy. The cover letter is dated 12/28, but Patsy was asked to sign and date one of the pages and she dated it 12/27/1996. All spelling, abbreviations and punctuation was copied from the typed sheet - any differences will be described here.

On the first page, there are seventeen words listed on the left side of the page. After each word, there were spaces where Patsy was asked to write those words. She was asked to write "countermeasures" only two times. She was asked to write 100% six times. Not 100 percent, 100%. Most words she asked to write three or four times.

I want to note a few things right off the bat. Will do them as individual posts to make commenting easier.
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#2
1 - Patsy tends to mix printing and cursive. I have found that to be true while studying her historical writings and found the same in her personal notes to me. Same thing in this exemplar. Looking at the full page, I would say she may have been asked to print during this session. Still, very few of the words are completely printed with no letters joined as in cursive. Many of her letters are joined.

That habit would have been very difficult to resolve when writing a ransom note.

2. The capital letter J. Patsy was asked to write John and she did NOT put a horizontal line on the top. In the London letter, there is an address found - King James Blvd. The J in James does have the horizontal line in the sample she was asked to copy, but when Patsy wrote out that note, she did not add the horizontal line.

Just a small detail, but the author of the ransom note, towards the end, wrote the name John three times - and each had the horizontal line. Could the author have gone back and added that line? Sure. But considering the situation if you are making a case against Patsy - - if you just murdered your own daughter in such a heartless way, could you have written that note, made "corrections" to disguise your writing - - - and not left tears on the paper?

I think the handwriting will be a match to the killer's historical handwriting. Professional handwriting experts agree. The note was not written slowly and carefully - the ink wasn't bleeding into the paper. Disguising a 2 1/2 page note would be nearly impossible.

3. The letter a - - the TYPE a with the cap and the simple a consisting of a circle and downstroke. Well, Patsy used BOTH. Writing Mr. Ramsey, she used the type a. Signing her name at the bottom, she used the simple a. Withdraw got the typed a, authorities and attache got the simple a. (interesting, in the left list, attache didn't have an accent mark - - and Patsy's copies didn't have it either.) But family, daughter and bank - 10 sample words involved there, had both kinds of a.

The London letter included both a's as well. I couldn't find any "rule" for when one was used, not necessarily the first letter in a word, not necessarily used in proper nouns. She just used both kinds as she wrote.

A big deal was made about Patsy "changing" her letter a. I never saw evidence of that at all. She used both throughout.

4. Copying the London Letter - - she was given a copy of the London Letter - types out with no corrections made in it. At one point in her copy, Patsy made an error, crossed off the error and continued. That was of interest. I know some people who put a single line through such errors. Others cover the mistakes with little circles. Others scratch it out with side to side marks, over and over.

Knowing full well that I am not a handwriting expert, knowing it is impossible to properly compare writing using "copies", I can only say I would have expected those "cross outs" to have been seriously studied by the handwriting analysts.

I think that detail could be important at some point.
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#3
Need to add this. The addition of the word "not" to the phrase "do ^not like you". Patsy's ^ points up and is found very low, near the line. The ransom note writer's is a v shape and higher up. I don't have any idea how Patsy was taught, or what her habits weree when making such corrections - that seems like something investigators should have looked into. Just saying.
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#4
EXEMPLAR #2

Dated Jan 4th, 1997

This consists of THREE copies of the ransom note. I believe it was dictated to her as no typed copy is attached. (Third sample on this date will be covered in separate post. Sorry if confusing.)

The first is written with a normal sharpie kind of writing instrument. The second and third - a thinner instrument and took less than 2 pages to complete.

Revisiting my list of 4 details... and adding a couple more points to watch for.

Printing and cursive - It is obvious that Patsy was told to print the ransom note. It is also a fact that she slipped a few times into cursive. One example I will share is when she wrote words ending in "ing" she often joined the letters together. The ransom note didn't have the same joining. Yes, some letters were close, but not enough to make me feel experts needed to jump on that detail.

Capital J - Interesting, in both of the samples, Patsy added the cross on the top of the capital J. I admit, I wonder if she was asked to add it. Will be interesting to see other samples.

The letter a - - again, Patsy uses both throughout. The ransom note writer preferred the type-capped a and I expect his historical writings would mirror that habit.

Cross-outs - - My guess is that Patsy ws asked to print the word "delivery" then cross it out. In both letters, an X is used to "cross out" the word.

FBI - - In both letters, periods are placed between the letters

etc. - - in both letters, abbreviated as etc.

Advise, advize - Patsy clearly wasn't sure how to spell that word. In each letter, she spelled it both ways, and not in the same order. The ink is darker, she clearly hesitated when she wrote that word. The ransom note author, however, didn't hesitate to write the word and spelled it with an s both times. I know this word becomes important later on - - at least I think I remember that it does.

Going offline for a bit. But I think this is a good start.


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level 2
jameson245
OP
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10 hr. ago
Reviewing THIRD copy of the ransom note Patsy was asked to write on 1/4/1997. Realize, please, this is just 9 days after the murder. Patsy was still being medicated and her emotions had to be simply overwhelming. The police were not just getting samples, they were not just observing, they were talking to her, hoping to get a confession.



So for the third time, Patsy had to write that ransom note, word for word. I can't imagine how stunned she had to feel after doing it twice.

In the second, there is part that is quite "different". I believe she was asked to write using her left hand there. There is more of that in the third copy. I can make out the words but in no way would I suggest Patsy was ambidextrous.





Printing and cursive - fewer cases of cursive, but she still slipped into it on occasion. Big example (in case BPD is reading this) is the word "around" on the second page, next to last paragraph.

Capital J - Patsy added the cross on the top of the capital J.

The letter a - - again, Patsy uses both.

Cross-outs - - Patsy used long horizontal lines, back and forth, to "cross out" the word "delivery".

FBI - - Using left hand, periods are NOT found between the letters

etc. - - abbreviated as etc.

Advise, advize - Spelled both ways with hesitation evident the second time the word was written.
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#5
Starting Exemplar #3 - 5 "attachments" - I will deal with them one at a time.

Attachment A -

CBI form - routine form - name, address, vital info - all written in cursive.

Under that is a place to "WRITE - DO NOT PRINT" SMALL AND CAPITAL LETTERS. Interesting, the letters here are all printed. Had the examiner wanted them cursive, why didn't they instruct Patsy to fill out the, or another, form as directed? On the right hand side of the page, Patsy copied 9 names and 4 addresses. All numerals are there, all letters included. All in print.

I believe Patsy was told to "reverse" the instructions, to write in cursive the top left set of questions and to print the letters. Her reaction to that would have been noted. If they had wanted the instructions followed, they would have had her fill out the form as requested.
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#6
Exemplar 3 attachment B

The London Letter is typed on the top of the page and Patsy copied it on lines below. Nothing of interest there EXCEPT there are ZERO type-capped a's. Every a is a simple circle with vertical line.

Exemplar 3 Attachment C Dated 2/28/1997

Three paragraphs, NOT the ransom note but many words are in the paragraphs that are included in the ransom note - - some would be considered "trigger" words or phrases. This would be the project suggested by psychiatrist Stephen Pitt.

The printing is clear, unlike John's writing. Clearer than the writing in the ransom note.

And there is not ONE type-capped a included.

By then, who knows why the fancier letter is gone? I have no explanation for it but don't think it is evidence of guilt at all. To the best of my knowledge, the Ramseys and their lawyers still did not have a copy of the ransom note and would not have known what details the experts would be looking for. Yes, they saw the note on the 26th, but Patsy said she had not read the whole thing, that was not disputed by others in the house that day - - she was crying hysterically, puking or staring out the window most of the morning. She was not studying the note. The BPD took the note, left no copy, and it was locked away, seen by few. (That is what got me on the suspect list - - the fact so few knew JonBenet's name was missing from the note but I posted that fact early in February.)
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#7
Exemplar 3 attachment B

The London Letter is typed on the top of the page and Patsy copied it on lines below. Nothing of interest there EXCEPT there are ZERO type-capped a's. Every a is a simple circle with vertical line.

Exemplar 3 Attachment C Dated 2/28/1997

Three paragraphs, NOT the ransom note but many words are in the paragraphs that are included in the ransom note - - some would be considered "trigger" words or phrases. This would be the project suggested by psychiatrist Stephen Pitt.

The printing is clear, unlike John's writing. Clearer than the writing in the ransom note.

And there is not ONE type-capped a included.

By then, who knows why the fancier letter is gone? I have no explanation for it but don't think it is evidence of guilt at all. To the best of my knowledge, the Ramseys and their lawyers still did not have a copy of the ransom note and would not have known what details the experts would be looking for. Yes, they saw the note on the 26th, but Patsy said she had not read the whole thing, that was not disputed by others in the house that day - - she was crying hysterically, puking or staring out the window most of the morning. She was not studying the note. The BPD took the note, left no copy, and it was locked away, seen by few. (That is what got me on the suspect list - - the fact so few knew JonBenet's name was missing from the note but I posted that fact early in February.)
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#8
Exemplar 3 Attachment D

Patsy was given a typed copy of the actual ransom note and was asked to write it word for word. This sample was taken and each page was kept with the following page from the pad - clearly to study the bleed through.

Patsy spelled advize the same way both times on this paper - - but the typed copy spelled it advise both times. Patsy, on all copies of the note, capitalized the word "Southern", unlike the typed note she was copying. The author of the ransom note did not capitalize that word. Capitalizing that particular word is important to real linguistic experts. Check it out yourself and let me know what you think. Would you capitalize it?

Not that may be of interest - - in the typed copy, periods are put after all letters in the signature - S.B.T.C. - - Patsy didn't put any periods in that part. She signed it SBTC
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#9
Exemplar 3 Attachment E

The third time Patsy was required to copy that horrible letter, the actual ransom note. I think by this time she is frustrated and angry and hurt and, dare I suggest she may have been trying to "just get this done"?

This is the copy where Patsy did not abbreviate the word etcetera but spelled it out. She misspelled advise twice, (advize), capitalized "Southern", added the horizontal letter on the top of John's name (3 times) and never wrote a type-capped a.

Trying to put myself in her shoes - - knowing she was the #1 suspect and that the BPD was making that clear to the media... having to read and write and once again live with that horrible note foremost in her mind..... I don't think Patsy was being deceptive at all at this point. She could have refused yet another sample but was being cooperative - - a lot more cooperative than most of us would be to be sure! Looking at the exemplars, I think she had found a way to "remove" herself a bit. Just my perception but I want to share that idea. I think she was copying words, trying not to focus on what they were.
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#10
Exemplar #4 - - two left handed efforts to copy three paragraphs. NOT the ransom note, this project was, to the best of my knowledge, the work of Stephen Pitt, the psychiatrist who worked with the BPD as a consultant.

They knew from earlier left-handed samples that Patsy did not write this note with her left hand. They knew it was unlikely she wrote it with her right hand either, but at this point, the formation of the letters was not the point, the point was to bring Patsy in, add that to the media information in order to put more civilian attention on her as the suspect. It was also, as Dale Yeager put it, to put her under pressure, to "push buttons", to see if she might cave in and give the BPD the confession they wanted.

I found this sample upsetting when I saw it for what it was and now, 25 years later, I think it is time to share exactly what Exemplar #4 was. I hope posters will read the three paragraphs and comment on the CONTENT, the rather threatening messaging that was taking place.
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