other crimes
#1
April, 2008


Jurors took less than three hours Thursday to reject a 49-year-old pizza delivery man's tale of killing a paramour 20 years his junior in a fit of rage after she threatened to expose the claimed affair to his wife.

Instead, the 10-woman, two-man jury in Knox County Criminal Court declared Marvin Joseph Hill guilty of first-degree murder and abuse of a corpse in the May 2006 slaying of Christina Jeanette Eubanks, 28, inside her Fort Sanders apartment.
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Assistant District Attorney General Takisha Fitzgerald painted a different portrait for jurors, arguing that Hill had been trying unsuccessfully to woo Eubanks when he turned up on her doorstep with a stun gun, which he used to render her unconscious in order to rape her.
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#2
Illinois Aunt Charged in Boy's Stun Gun Death
November 26, 1994|Associated Press




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PEORIA, Ill. — A woman was accused of killing her 7-month-old nephew with an electric stun gun because she wanted to quiet him.
Francine Knox, 37, was charged with manslaughter Wednesday in the May 28 death of Brandon Jordan. Knox was not charged immediately because authorities were investigating other cases and the effects of stun guns on children, officials said.
The infant was the son of Knox's brother, Anthony Jordan Jr., and Carolyn Hollins. After the couple lost custody of their four children, Brandon was placed in Knox's care.


(She was later found guilty and sentenced to 14 years.)
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#3
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Homicidal manual strangulation and multiple stun-gun injuries.
(PMID:1288262)
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Ikeda N , Harada A , Suzuki T

The American Journal of Forensic Medicine and Pathology [01 Dec 1992, 13(4):320-323]
Type: Journal Article, Case Reports
A comment on this article appears in "Homicidal manual strangulation and multiple stun gun injuries." Am J Forensic Med Pathol. 1993 Sep;14(3):271.
Abstract
Stun guns are electric shock devices that are used by a number of law enforcement agencies to subdue violent offenders, but sometimes are discharged into human bodies as offensive weapons. We autopsied a 22-year-old woman who was strangled and had many stun-gun injuries on her head, chest, abdomen, arms, and legs. The stun-gun injuries consisted of many pairs of round erythemas with or without central paleness, some of which were accompanied by circumferential abrasions. To determine whether the electric shocks were administered before or after her death, we studied stun-gun injuries on pigs before and after death and found that the shocks after death did not mark the animal skin. Based on this experiment, all of the stun-gun injuries on the victim's body were concluded to have been inflicted before her death.
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