Interesting news story
#1
DA pursues new Ramsey lead
Hunter asks police to investigate woman's story of sex abuse By Barrie Hartman Camera Staff Writer [c] Feb 25 2000 Boulder Publishing Inc.
District Attorney Alex Hunter has turned over new information to Boulder police and the FBI that he says could provide a major breakthrough in solving the 3-year-old JonBenét Ramsey murder case.
The information is from testimony and documents provided voluntarily by a 37-year-old California woman who was brought forward by Boulder attorney Lee Hill. The woman said she has suffered a lifetime of sexual and physical abuse, beginning at age 3. Her story, if true, could mean the Ramsey case is tangled in sexual abuse and involves more people than originally thought. Hunter said he finds the woman to be "very believable." Boulder police detectives, however, aren't so sure.
"Even if only 15 percent of what she says is true," Hunter said, "this case warrants investigation. And if Boulder cops don't want to do it, I will take the case to the U.S. Attorney."
Police Chief Mark Beckner said Thursday, "Though our detectives did not find her to be credible, we are taking what she said seriously.
"I'm interested in finding the truth no matter where it leads us."
Beckner said the first thing his detectives will do is perform a thorough background check of the woman and meet with her therapist of 10 years in an attempt to corroborate her story.
Hill, who is a former San Diego County deputy district attorney and former special assistant U.S. attorney and is experienced in investigative work, said, "She is among the most credible witnesses I have ever interviewed." He is representing the woman in her decision to give information to authorities.
The woman has described to police years of sexual and physical abuse in California homes at the hands of adults who stayed at holiday and other parties after other guests had left for the evening. Then, she said, another "party," one of sexual abuse for the gratification of a select group of adults, would begin.
In talking to detectives, the woman draws parallels between sexual techniques used at these sessions and the physical evidence of garroting that investigators found on the body of JonBenét Ramsey. The woman told detectives she believes JonBenét was killed accidentally when an asphyxiation technique used to stimulate an orgasmic response during a child sex and porno "party" went too far.
The woman told police she knows firsthand about asphyxiation (choking) to produce a sexual response because it had been done to her when she was a child. The woman said in her experience little girls were dressed provocatively and trained to say provocative things, such as, "It's a pleasure to please you." She told police that when girls did not perform as expected, they were struck on the head. That was because their hair covered the wound. A big night for such "parties" was Christmas night, she said. Over the years, she said, many parties were held then because a large number of cars around a house did not arouse suspicion in the neighborhood and the children had a full week to heal from their wounds before returning to school.
JonBenét Ramsey's death occurred overnight Christmas 1996. The autopsy report concluded she suffered a blow on the head and was strangled. The woman said she knows the Ramseys through the Fleet White family. She said the godfather to her mother is Fleet White Sr., 86, of California. Fleet White Jr. of Boulder and John Ramsey were close friends until the death of JonBenét.
White Jr. was with John Ramsey when JonBenét's body was found in the basement of the Ramsey's Boulder home. White Jr. has since been crusading for Hunter's ouster from this case for refusing to prosecute the Ramseys. Ramsey's attorney, Bryan Morgan, declined comment. Fleet White could not be reached Thursday.
Police cleared White as a suspect in April 1997.
Attorney Hill said the woman came forward because she was fearful for her life. She came to believe that people involved in child sexual abuse in California were becoming suspicious that she might try to talk to authorities. Hill said her main reason, however, was to try to save "other innocent victims who can't speak for themselves" from further sexual abuse.
The woman and her therapist of 10 years, Mary Bienkowski, saw Hill being interviewed on Fox television about a deposition he had taken of John Ramsey in a libel suit against a supermarket tabloid. They decided to contact him. The Camera's efforts to reach Bienkowski have been unsuccessful.
Hill, struck by what he heard, traveled to San Luis Obispo near Los Angeles on Feb. 11. He spent five hours interviewing both the woman and her therapist, and he videotaped supporting documents, which included personal notes, cards and family photographs that the woman says are from the Whites, both senior and junior.
Hill recounted details of the interview to Hunter in a meeting Feb. 16. With him was Stephen Singular, a Denver author who has pursued the Ramsey case for three years and is convinced the killing is linked to child sexual abuse. Both men expressed to Hunter intense frustration about the reluctance of police to consider evidence that deviated from their theories.
The woman called Hill again Saturday, and he arranged for her to fly to Denver. He picked her up at 12:30 a.m. Sunday at Denver International Airport and found safe housing for her.
Hunter immediately tried to arrange for detectives to interview the woman. Two detectives interviewed her at 3 p.m. Tuesday for nearly five hours. It was during that interview that Hill learned Boulder police had received a missing person's report on the woman. A relative of the woman filed the report with San Luis Obispo authorities, who called Boulder police. Boulder police, Hill said, responded that she was in Boulder and would be interviewed by detectives at 3 p.m. Tuesday. They also told San Luis Obispo police she was with Lee Hill.
"I couldn't believe it," Hill said. "We had told police her life was in danger; then they tell everyone where she is and what she is doing."
Police Chief Beckner said he thought it was his department's responsibility to respond to the missing person's report. Hill says police should have asked the witness whether she wanted them to respond.
The Ramsey case has been quiet for the last several months, following a 13-month grand jury investigation that prosecutors said did not find enough evidence to bring an indictment in the case.
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#2
And another -

PART ONE

Lawyer struggles to regain license

By B.J. Plasket
The Daily Times-Call

BOULDER - Forty-four-year-old Walter Leon Hill has been a lot of
things in his life.
A naval intelligence officer.
A deputy district attorney.
A federal prosecutor.
A part-Choctaw American Indian activist.
A prominent Boulder attorney known for his straight, dark,
shoulder-length hair and his penchant for taking on unpopular people
and causes - including American Indian activist Leonard Peltier, who
is serving a life term in Leavenworth, Kan., for killing a federal
agent.
But he's also been known as a guy who can't say no to a needy client
and one who takes on more work than he can handle. Nancy J. Krebs fit that profile when Hill met her in early 2000, not long before allegations from the 37-year-old California woman stirred up the stagnating investigation of the murder of JonBenet Ramsey.
Hill took on Krebs as a client when she first came forward with
claims she had been molested as a child by a group of wealthy
individuals that included members of the family of Fleet Russell
White Jr., the reported former best friend of John Ramsey.
Little did Hill know that his involvement with Krebs, the Ramsey
case and Fleet White would be the first of a series of eerily
spiraling events that have left a once articulate, charismatic and
extremely bright lawyer penniless and homeless.
Hill said his deterioration began with an auto accident in June
2000, just weeks after he represented Krebs while she was in Boulder
to share her story. The wreck, which he still terms "suspicious,"
left him with a compound wrist fracture and a head trauma, injuries
that required prescription sedatives, painkillers and anti-seizure
medication.
According to Hill, his law practice began to suffer soon after the
accident, with the injuries and medication leaving him unable to
represent clients.
From there, Hill's life and career descended further. He neglected
cases, lost his license and now faces the possibility of prison time
due to domestic violence and restraining order violation charges.
Hill claims that because of his involvement with a brief but
sensational part of the Ramsey case, Boulder police, the Boulder
County Dstrict Attorney's Office and White all contributed to his
downfall.

Criminal libel
Since Krebs' arrival in Boulder in early 2000, White has obsessively
thrown himself into the Ramsey investigation, setting up an
inevitable head-on collision with Lee Hill.
He has filed several unsuccessful lawsuits seeking to prosecute
media entities on criminal libel charges for their reporting of
Krebs' allegations, and in fact he was sentenced to 30 days in the
Jefferson County Jail after ignoring a subpoena to appear as a
defense witness in a bribery trial in November 2001.
In August 2000, White filed a complaint with Boulder police asking
that a dozen media outlets and reporters be charged with criminal
libel for reporting Krebs' allegations of sexual assault by members
of the White family.
Two years later, in a successful suit filed to obtain copies of
Krebs' statements to police, White said that Krebs "falsely reported
to the Boulder police that she had been a victim of serious and
violent crimes committed by members of the (White) family,"
including himself.


After receiving a 600-page investigative report from Boulder police,
then-District Attorney Alex Hunter sought a special prosecutor to
review the libel allegations. District Judge Roxanne Bailin
appointed Pueblo District Attorney Gus Sandstrom to review the case
but pulled the plug on the investigation after receiving a letter
from White in which he criticized the appointment of Sandstrom and
asked Bailin to conduct the investigation properly or "not at all."
White appealed Bailin's order to the Colorado Court of Appeals, but
the appeal was rejected. He later asked the Colorado Attorney
General's Office to launch a special prosecution but was turned
down.
White again sought criminal charges against the media after Mary
Keenan took office as Boulder County's district attorney. A second
investigation - this one by El Paso County District Attorney Jeanne
Smith - was launched in 2002. Smith's office eventually declined to
file charges against media entities or Krebs. The Whites in February
filed an action asking Smith's office to show cause why charges were
not filed, but that action was dismissed when Fleet White failed to
show up for a hearing and his wife, Priscilla White, told Bailin she
had nothing to say in the matter.
Earlier this month, White filed an appeal of Smith's decision.
White this month also filed a motion to compel Keenan to file grand
jury-secrecy violations against unnamed individuals in connection
with the grand jury that investigated JonBenet's death.
While Hill spent only a few months representing Krebs, the events of
the previous two years came full circle in the summer of 2002 when
the paths of Hill, White, the Boulder Police Department and the
Boulder County District Attorney's Office crossed again. This time,
however, the focus was not on JonBenet Ramsey but on Hill.
The People vs. Lee Hill
Hill openly admits that he takes on more work than he can handle, is
sometimes unorganized and almost always late to appointments.
"I can't argue with those characterizations of me," he admitted.
Lee Hill is used to being thought of as an eccentric but talented
rebel. On Aug. 2, 2002, he became something he had never been before
- a criminal defendant who claims he is being railroaded for his
ties to the Ramsey case.
Police were called to the north Boulder home of Lee Hill and his
wife, Bonnie, just after 10 p.m. that night, minutes after she
called police to say her husband attacked her and held a gun to her
head. Lee Hill was arrested on charges of menacing with a deadly
weapon, a felony, and third-degree assault/domestic violence, a
misdemeanor.
Police took him to jail, and Bonnie Hill was taken - against her
will, she claims - to an area safehouse for women.
Bonnie Hill now says it was she who, during an episode brought on by
untreated depression, attacked her husband, who was bleeding when
police arrived. Lee Hill says he was merely trying to subdue his
enraged wife as she angrily dumped out boxes that had been packed
for a move and that he picked up the gun only to keep it away from
her.


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#3
According to a statement given to police by Lee Hill's mother,
Janice Hill, it was Bonnie who instigated the incident.
"I was upstairs, and I heard screaming," the statement says. "Bonnie
was hitting, striking at Lee. He was trying to stop her from hitting
him. Lee Hill said,'You attacked me, and I'm bleeding - stop it.
Calm down, calm down.' Lee stopped trying to hold her and keep her
from hitting him, at which time she said,'I'm going to call the
police.' Lee said,'Call the police.' When she refused to calm down,
he got a gun and told her,'Get your keys and get out.'"
Hill said he was face down in the street and being handcuffed when
he saw former nemesis and Boulder Detective Tom Trujillo approach
and say, "Hi, Lee. How's it going?"
"I told him,'I've had better days,'" Hill recalled.
Hill and Trujillo had gotten into a well-publicized shouting match
two years before during a meeting with Krebs and Boulder police.
Hill said he verbally "tore into" Trujillo during that meeting
because police had told California authorities Krebs' whereabouts
and the time of the meeting.
San Luis Obispo, Calif., police had in turn told Krebs' family, and
she had told police she feared her family and did not want them to
know where she was.
But Hill's problems did not end with the Aug. 2 arrest.
He was arrested a second time - this time for violating bond
conditions that prohibited him from contact with Bonnie - on Nov.
18, 2002, after a maintenance man at a Westminster apartment complex
said he saw Hill and his wife together.
Both Lee and Bonnie Hill say she was in Hong Kong, her native land,
when the alleged contact occurred.
"We have witnesses who will confirm that Bonnie Hill was in Hong
Kong on that day," said her lawyer, Steven Strauss.
"The maintenance man described Bonnie as 5-foot-6 and weighing about
130 pounds, and he didn't mention her hair length," Lee Hill said.
"Bonnie is 5 feet tall, 100 pounds soaking wet, and has hair below
her waist."
Restraining order
Strangely, it was after bonding out on that charge that Lee Hill
noticed the names of Fleet and Priscilla White on the
restraining-order portion of his bond papers.
The conditions of Hill's bond prohibited him from contact with both
White and White's wife, Priscilla.
Fleet and Priscilla White, according the district attorney's office,
have no connection with Hill's criminal case.
Hill maintains the odd presence of those two names on his bond
conditions is evidence of what he called a malicious prosecution on
the part of the district attorney's office.
Assistant District Attorney Karen Peters, who is prosecuting the
case, says she doesn't know how the Whites' names were placed on
Hill's bond conditions.
"I actually noticed that before," she said. "I have no idea why they
are or who put them on there. It was nothing from our office. I
haven't even spoken to Fleet White on the phone."
Peters said she has made no inquiry into the origin of the names on
the bond conditions.
Hill said both Fleet and Priscilla White attended all of his court
hearings after his August arrest but stopped doing so after his
November arrest - the time at which their names appeared on the bond
conditions.
He said there is no record of anyone asking for the Whites to be
placed on his bond conditions, and none could be found.
"They were present at every single one of my judicial hearings -
including the first - until the second arrest," Hill said. "They
would wait outside after the hearings. They were just sort of
lurking in their car. I called attention to their presence to Karen
Peters in the months preceding my second arrest, and she acted like
she didn't know who they were."
Longtime Boulder County journalist Wayne Laugesen said White
displayed unusual interest in a story Laugesen wrote about the legal
abuse of restraining orders in the late 1990s while working for the
now-defunct Boulder Planet.

"I wrote a story about how easy it is to abuse the system and obtain
restraining orders," Laugesen said. "Fleet White, whom I had never
met, called me and told me the article was very interesting and
asked me to meet him for coffee to discuss it.
"I met him at a coffee shop, and we discussed the article. That was
the only time we talked."
Even Bonnie Hill's lawyer finds the presence of Fleet and Priscilla
White's names on the bond conditions to be odd, citing "the amount
of pressure Mr. White has been able to place in this case.
"It appears," he said, "that Mr. White had undue influence over the
authorities."
White did not return a phone call seeking comment.
Boulder, Honolulu and Hong Kong
The case against Lee Hill is, if nothing else, geographically
diverse.
Bonnie Hill is in Hong Kong. Steven Strauss, her attorney, is in
Hawaii. And Lee Hill is, by his own admission, "hiding out" at
borrowed quarters in the Boulder area.
While the distance between the parties hasn't derailed the legal
proceedings against Hill, it has certainly slowed them down.
Prosecutors recently obtained a four-month delay in Hill's trial on
the domestic violence charges, and the trial on the bond-violation
charge is likely to be postponed because Casey Mulligan, Hill's
lawyer, last week filed a motion asking to withdraw from the case,
citing differences of opinion.
Still, that hasn't stopped Bonnie Hill from coming to the defense of
her now-estranged husband.
In January, she wrote a seven-page letter to Peters declaring her
husband's innocence and taking responsibility for the August
incident that landed him in jail - calling her own actions "episodic
extreme irascibility."
"I know my husband wasn't trying to hurt me," she wrote. "If he had
been trying to hurt me, I would surely have taken a trip to the
hospital, as he is formidably trained in the martial and survival
fighting arts. My husband did subdue me as I struggled to walk
through him in order to continue my announced and irrational
objective - to empty all the boxes he had just packed, which were,
each and every one, filled with weaponry that would have been quite
dangerous to toss to the floor, although in my state of aggravation
I failed to realize at this time. It is fortunate he prevented me
from reaching the boxes."
Bonnie Hill also criticized what she termed the "eight to 12 police
officers" who responded to the scene, writing, "None of them asked
me what I wanted to do or what I wanted to have occur. I never
wanted my husband arrested and I never wanted to be separated from
him."
She said the separation forced by the bond conditions has adversely
affected both her health and that of her husband.
"Boulder police do not seem to be willing to acknowledge this, nor
are they interested at all in what actually occurred or what impacts
their actions had upon me (whom they designate a victim) or the rest
of the family," her letter said.
Bonnie Hill also lashed out at police for issuing a press release
containing both her name and address, saying the department violated
her privacy.
Boulder police have declined to comment on the case. Police
spokeswoman Jodie Carroll said, "Out of respect for the victim, the
police department does not wish to discuss the details of any
particular domestic violence call."
She said Trujillo responded to the Hill residence because he was on
duty as a patrol supervisor and is no longer a detective.


Strauss said Peters has mostly ignored his efforts to convey his
client's side of the story.
"I placed a phone call to Ms. Peters and followed it with a letter.
I received no response," he said.
On Jan. 27, Strauss sent Peters a letter requesting that she
"immediately communicate to the trial judge Mrs. Hill's location
(Hong Kong) and full position," but he claims Peters never acted on
the information. He also sent a letter to Keenan asking her to
"investigate the issues raised in my letter to Ms. Peters."
Strauss said he finally talked to Peters when he traveled to
Colorado and hand-delivered a letter outlining Bonnie Hill's
situation. "Ms. Peters questioned my involvement in the case," he
said.
Peters refused to comment on the case but denied allegations by the
Hills that police made fun of Bonnie Hill's race on the night of her
husband's arrest by saying that Asian women are "wild and crazy"
when they get mad.
"The officers say that didn't happen," she said.
Peters also scoffed at the thought of a legal-community conspiracy
against Lee Hill.
"I've listened to the 911 tape," she said. "This case was initiated
by Bonnie Hill, not the police or the D.A."
Strauss this week said he is not done with Boulder officials.
"I have developed evidence of civil rights violations involving Mrs.
Hill on the night she was taken to the safehouse," she said.
In a January letter to Keenan, Strauss was more specific.
"Please also be advised that I am evaluating Mrs. Hill's claims
against Boulder County for police and prosecutor misconduct under
(federal law), including violation of her rights to due process and
equal protection. These violations stem from involuntary detention
on the night of the arrest of her husband," his letter said.
Strauss said Peters at first told him she merely wanted Bonnie Hill
to return to Boulder to "testify truthfully," but later told him the
district attorney's office would consider paying for her return
"based on her level of cooperation."
"I have ethical concerns about that stance," he said, adding that he
believes Lee Hill may be the victim of what he called "selective
prosecution."
Lying in wait
As Lee Hill awaits two trials that could land him in prison and take
away both his right to bear arms and the concealed-weapon permit he
has had since 1990, he says he still hopes to practice law and
reunite with his wife.
"There are people out there who have asked me to help them, and I
can't do it," he said. "I love my wife, and we want to be together."
With his legal reputation in tatters, in part because of a grievance
filed against him by a former client, Hill also clings to a hope
that he will one day practice law again.
Following the accident and grievance, he agreed to temporarily be
placed on inactive status pending his recovery, but later was
required to undergo medical tests before being re-activated. He
claims officials with the Colorado Office of Attorney Regulation
last year told him he would be reinstated, but later wrote a letter
telling him he would not be reinstated until he underwent a series
of neurological tests.
"I now have to prepay $4,700 for the tests, and I don't have the
money," he said. His license remains inactive.
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#4
Lee Hill charged with felony
Wife says police exploited her to "get" Hill
by Wayne Laugesen
Famed defense lawyer and former federal prosecutor W. Lee Hill faces felony charges after an arrest Friday, Aug. 2, following a scuffle with his wife at their northeast Boulder home. Hill, 43, stands charged with felony menacing and misdemeanor assault. He's free on $1,500 bond.
Police insist Hill-friend and lawyer to beatnik poets and movie star Steven Seagal-pulled his wife's hair and held her down during an argument Friday night. During the scuffle, police say, Hill grabbed a 9-mm Glock handgun and ordered his wife to leave the house. His wife, Bonnie Hill, says the police have it wrong and that she was the aggressor.
"I was angry and out of control, and he attempted to calm me down," Bonnie Hill, 31, told Boulder Weekly. "When he grabbed my wrist, it threw me into a rage. I get that way when I'm angry. Looking back, I realize that Lee was trying to help."
Lee Hill says Bonnie was packing up the couple's possessions for a move. She had been placed on new anti-depression medication, and it was proving to agitate her. At one point, Lee Hill says, Bonnie became frustrated and started dumping the contents of packed boxes on the floor.
"I asked her to stop doing that," Lee Hill says. "She flew out of control in a violent rage. I tried to calm her down and was trying to hold her so she would not injure either of us."
Bonnie suffered scrapes and scratches on her arms and Lee suffered scratches on his face and chest, and a bleeding contusion to his lip.
"He's a lot more injured than I am, and now he's not so handsome," Bonnie says, laughing. "I think I gave him a concussion, too."
Lee Hill says he trained Bonnie in self defense, which is why she was able to injure him during her fit of rage.
"The training I had given her made it difficult for me to calm her down without both of us incurring some injuries," Hill says. "She did give me a concussion, precisely because I tought her how to do that to someone with the proper blow to the head."



AND ANOTHER


Lee Hill charged with felony
Wife says police exploited her to "get" Hill
by Wayne Laugesen
Famed defense lawyer and former federal prosecutor W. Lee Hill faces felony charges after an arrest Friday, Aug. 2, following a scuffle with his wife at their northeast Boulder home. Hill, 43, stands charged with felony menacing and misdemeanor assault. He's free on $1,500 bond.
Police insist Hill-friend and lawyer to beatnik poets and movie star Steven Seagal-pulled his wife's hair and held her down during an argument Friday night. During the scuffle, police say, Hill grabbed a 9-mm Glock handgun and ordered his wife to leave the house. His wife, Bonnie Hill, says the police have it wrong and that she was the aggressor.
"I was angry and out of control, and he attempted to calm me down," Bonnie Hill, 31, told Boulder Weekly. "When he grabbed my wrist, it threw me into a rage. I get that way when I'm angry. Looking back, I realize that Lee was trying to help."
Lee Hill says Bonnie was packing up the couple's possessions for a move. She had been placed on new anti-depression medication, and it was proving to agitate her. At one point, Lee Hill says, Bonnie became frustrated and started dumping the contents of packed boxes on the floor.
"I asked her to stop doing that," Lee Hill says. "She flew out of control in a violent rage. I tried to calm her down and was trying to hold her so she would not injure either of us."
Bonnie suffered scrapes and scratches on her arms and Lee suffered scratches on his face and chest, and a bleeding contusion to his lip.
"He's a lot more injured than I am, and now he's not so handsome," Bonnie says, laughing. "I think I gave him a concussion, too."
Lee Hill says he trained Bonnie in self defense, which is why she was able to injure him during her fit of rage.
"The training I had given her made it difficult for me to calm her down without both of us incurring some injuries," Hill says. "She did give me a concussion, precisely because I taught her how to do that to someone with the proper blow to the head."

Lee's guns and knives were out of their normal storage areas so they could be packed for the move, the couple says. Lee says the Glock in question was on a table nearby, and he was concerned about it because of the turmoil.
"I handed the gun to my mother and asked her to get it out of the room, in the interest of her safety, Bonnie's safety and my safety," says Hill, who began carrying weapons while working as a federal narcotics prosecutor. Bonnie says Lee pointed the gun at her, but only in self-defense.
"I understand why he did that, because I was raging and I was standing right next to most of his guns and knives, which we had been preparing to pack," Bonnie says. "I was not frightened when he pointed the gun, because he had every reason to point it at me. He felt threatened because I was in a rage, right next to all those weapons. I knew he was just protecting himself, and that he would never shoot me."
Lee says Bonnie may have perceived that the gun was pointed at her, as he picked it up and passed it to his mother, because it's difficult at a distance to see the true trajectory of a handgun.
Lee and Bonnie say they agreed to call the police, after things calmed down, because the scuffle had created a lot of noise. When police arrived, Hill was waiting for them outside the home.
"Police were directing me to say things about being scared," says Bonnie, who argues that her statements about fear are crammed into the police report, as afterthoughts, because they came after police read her initial statement and then put words into her mouth. "I was never afraid, I was angry. I was in a bad mental state, and they manipulated me against Lee, telling me what to say in the report. I'm very angry with the police."
Bonnie says at least one police officer told her mother-in-law, who was at the home, that "Asian women are crazy and wild." Bonnie Hill is Chinese.
Hill says the detective at the scene, Tom Trujillo, may have a grudge against him because of a past disagreement. Two years ago, Lee Hill was protecting and representing a possible witness in the JonBenet Ramsey murder case who feared for her life. Trujillo blew her cover, Hill says, by contacting authorities in California, who passed the information to people the witness feared most-family members who had filed a missing person's report.
"I yelled at Tom Trujillo for 10 minutes about the way he handled that, and (former) District Attorney Alex Hunter was present for the whole thing," Hill says.
Lee and Bonnie Hill have lived separately, by court order, since the arrest and are forbidden from contacting one another.
August 8, 2002
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