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  The Oxleys
Posted by: jameson245 - 02-08-2017, 04:31 PM - Forum: The House at 755 15th Street, Boulder, CO - Replies (7)

Melinda Soppel posted on  Facebook - moved here because things there tend to disappear...

Another interesting concept is the former owners of the home. The Oxleys The Ramsey's offered them a price for the home which was refused. It sat for awhile and didn't sell so they contacted them to see if they were still interested. The Oxleys were getting divorced and needed to sell. The Ramsey's then offered even less than the first time. The Oxleys reluctantly accepted but they were pretty angered about it---mostly the wife. I spoke with the son of the owner. The original owner is deceased but his former wife is still alive. I asked him if the difference in the price negotiation was anywhere near $118k and he thought it could have been but he wasn't sure. Both of the previous owners had lost children at a very young age. The wife was said to have connections with Israeli Mosel which caught my attention due to the foreign faction mention in the RN. I gave the son a copy of the RN to see if anything sounded familiar to him. His step mom was known for writing long threatening diatribes to family members but he said the handwriting didn't match. I sort of ruled this connection out but it's amazing how many types of possibilities there are in this crime.

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  Suzanne Savage
Posted by: jameson245 - 02-07-2017, 05:57 PM - Forum: Housekeepers, workers in the house - Replies (5)

Babysitter Burke liked, did a lot of arts and crafts with the kids.

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  OTHER HOUSEKEEPERS
Posted by: jameson245 - 02-07-2017, 05:45 PM - Forum: Housekeepers, workers in the house - Replies (17)

According to some police files I have access to, Between September 19, 1995 and December 11, 1996 - FOURTEEN different maids cleaned the Boulder home of John and Patsy Ramsey.    The Merry Maids would send teams of maids to work at the house together.  They cleaned the house on 9/19/1995, 9/26, 10/3, 10/10, 10/17, 10/19, 10/24.  Linda Hoffmann was hired late in 1995 (she had been a Merry Maid and left that job to work for the Ramseys)  but John and Patsy continued to have the Merry Maids in from time to time.

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  Jean Fortier
Posted by: jameson245 - 02-07-2017, 05:16 PM - Forum: Neighbors - Replies (1)

Lived two doors to the south, just past Diane brumfit

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  from the Huffington Post
Posted by: jameson245 - 02-06-2017, 09:07 PM - Forum: Grand Jury Indictments - Replies (1)

On Wednesday morning, Weld County Judge Robert Lowenbach ruled that the indictment will be released in response to a lawsuit filed by Daily Camera Reporter Charlie Brennan and the Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press in September.

The entire document is about 18 pages, The Daily Camera reports, nine of which relate to John and Patsy Ramsey, but it’s unclear how many of those will be released to the public.

“It appears that the District Attorney, presumably acting at the discretion of the grand jury, prepared a series of possible charges regarding John Ramsey and Patricia Ramsey based on the fact that the child had died and that there was evidence that a sexual assault of the child had occurred,” Lowenbach wrote in Wednesday’s ruling.


Earlier in the week, John Ramsey said he opposed the release of the document unless the entire grand jury record was also opened for the public. The judge denied that request on Wednesday.



@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@

OK, so the question is - - why would the judge not release the entire grand jury record if the SUSPECT or TARGET is willing to have it all public?  Is it to protect the witnesses?  The case?  Really?  After 20 years?  I personally think it is more to protect the persecutors who intentionally misled the grand jurors.    I am so sorry the jury did not issue a report as they did in the Tawana Brawley case in New York.

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  Unsolved Boulder crimes (2007)
Posted by: Summer Dawn - 02-06-2017, 08:44 PM - Forum: Boulder crimes - No Replies

Boulder County Unsolved Homicides

Boulder writer and historian and Camera columnist Silvia Pettem has compiled fact sheets on Boulder County cold cases for the Families of Homicide Victims and Missing Persons.

Howard Morton, the organization's director, shared that information with the Daily Camera.

Harold Nicholson, 18, was found dead May 23, 1970, beaten and stuffed into the trunk of a car he had bought the day before. It was parked three feet inside the Boulder County border near 134th Avenue and Sheridan Boulevard in Broomfield.

He had been married for five weeks and was reported missing when he failed to pick up his wife.

Gerald Cordner, 28, was shot in the back of the head, execution-style, on May 23, 1978, in what police called a drug-related robbery. Cordner was labeled a "large dealer" in cocaine with nationwide connections.

He was found two days later, slumped over a desk in the 95th Street farmhouse where he lived and apparently was trying some drugs when he died. Local drug users and dealers were reluctant to talk to police.

Sid Wells, 22, a University of Colorado journalism student from Longmont, was found shot to death Aug. 1, 1983, in an apartment his mother owned. The shotgun slaying also received worldwide exposure because he had been dating Robert Redford's daughter, Shauna, also a CU student.

The apartment's resident Thayne Smika, then 24, was arrested, then freed after the District Attorney's Office determined the evidence was not strong enough to prosecute.

Boulder police reopened the case in 1997, but the district attorney ruled police still didn't have sufficient evidence to arrest Smika, who has since vanished.

Margaret Hillman, 14, was reported missing in September 1983 after a party at Heil Ranch, north of Lefthand Canyon, where she lived with her family.

She had left the barn party about a mile from her home and told her parents she was going to ride home with another relative. It was determined she had not gone with any specific person, and her parents reported the next morning that she had not come home. Police thought she might have decided to walk home.

After an extensive search of the 5,000-acre ranch, officials found no trace of her. Almost a year later, in July 1984, her body was found in a ravine less than a mile from where she was last seen.

David Eugene Cox, 55, was found bludgeoned to death Jan. 4, 1994, in his mobile home at Boulder Meadows in North Boulder. He was last seen alive on New Year's Eve 1993.

An autopsy showed he died of massive head injuries caused by a blunt object, which police said was a cast-iron teakettle.

Cox had worked at Neodata and also had a business selling Indian jewelry and kachina dolls. He was divorced with no children and was survived by a brother.

JonBenet Ramsey, 6, was found dead Dec. 26, 1996, in the basement of her family's Boulder home on 15th Street. The slaying has attracted worldwide attention.

In August, a media circus descended on Boulder after John Mark Karr was arrested in connection with the decade-old case. He was exonerated after his DNA didn't match crime-scene evidence.

Susannah Chase, 23, a senior at the University of Colorado, died Dec. 22, 1997, a day after she was brutally beaten a block from her Whittier neighborhood home at 18th and Spruce streets.

Forensic testing five years later unearthed two new pieces of evidence: a fingerprint and a DNA sample pulled from a bloody bat found near the crime scene. But no one has been arrested in the case.

Frank Santos, 37, was fatally shot at 10:18 p.m. July 9, 2004, as he drove toward Boulder on U.S. 36 west of McCaslin Boulevard. A bullet fired through the driver's side window of his silver 1994 Chevrolet Cavalier hit him in the head.

Police looked for the driver of a large, dark SUV that was seen on the highway about the time of his death.

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  James Pennebaker
Posted by: jameson245 - 02-06-2017, 07:10 PM - Forum: Linguistics - Ransom Note - No Replies

Never heard of him but here he is with Aphrodite Jones.

http://www.investigationdiscovery.com/tv...nsom-note/


He notes that in the beginning, the author writes saying "we" - but by the second paragraph the person is writing as a lone wolf.  The use of John's name in the last paragraph - Pennebaker feels the killer knew John fairly well.

He has two people writing the note - a man coming up with ideas and a female doing the writing.

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  DR.OZ 2/7/2017
Posted by: jameson245 - 02-06-2017, 03:31 PM - Forum: What is in the news - staying up to date - Replies (8)

True Crime Tuesdays: Who Killed JonBenét Ramsey?
Airs 2/07/2017

Shocking new insight into one of the biggest unsolved murders in American history.
 It’s been 20 years since 6-year-old JonBenét Ramsey was murdered.
Today, we take a closer look at new theories surrounding her death.

Guests: Aphrodite Jones , John San Agustin , Elisabeth Leamy

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  Linda Hoffman Pugh in PMPT
Posted by: Summer Dawn - 02-06-2017, 03:15 PM - Forum: Housekeepers, workers in the house - Replies (2)

PMPT Page 198-202


Linda Hoffman-Pugh Story

"I was born in Lyons, Kansas, and my dad was a poor wheat farmer. I had three brothers and one sister. I'm the youngest, and one of my brothers is twenty-three years older than me. He's a welder, with his own construction business in Fort Morgan, Colorado.

When I was thirteen we moved to Fort Morgan because my dad wasn't doing well. He went to work for my brother as a ditch digger. My dad was an alcoholic. He died in 1986. My mother was forty-one when she had me. I have six living kids. Ten grandchildren. And a paper route.

I have my ladies, the women I work for. I have a doctor's wife in Greeley, and a lawyer. I was working for a bonded agency called Merry Maids when I met Patsy. I started with her one day a week. I was dumbfounded, the place was so huge. It was too much for one person. Soon we had four people, once a week.

Patsy was warm and kind. Just a sweet person. But she had a hard time keeping up the laundry. She was doing lots of charity work and was involved with her children's schooling.

Then I went to work for her three days a week, $72 a day. Monday, Wednesday, Friday. I'd get there at 9:00 in the morning and be gone by 3:00. That's when my daughter Ariana gets out of school. Sometimes I worked for Patsy on Saturdays and holidays. She gave me a $300 bonus at the end of my first year. That was October 27, 1996

Patsy was afraid she wasn't going to live, that her cancer would come back and she'd never live to see the children grow up. She read a lot about illness and healing. Every three months she had a checkup. She believed if she prayed, everything would be all right. Patsy admired John. He accomplished a lot. She told me that when they started out they had nothing, and they worked themselves up to where they were now.

I first met JonBenet when she was in preschool. She was home, like, half a day. Patsy called her Jonnie B. I spent half my time picking up after her. She and her brother would just leave everything on the floor-their socks, their shoes, toys, books, just everything. They were never trained to put things away properly.

I always came in the side door, and I'd walk right into the kitchen and not know where to start. Dishes all over. If they had Ovaltine, the jar would still be open. I always had to wipe the peanut butter off the counter. "I think we ought to get a hamper," I told Patsy.

"Yeah, that sounds good," she answered. But we never got one.

"Linda is not here to pick up," Patsy's mother would say.

"She's here to clean. How do you expect her to do a good job if she's picking up?"

"OK, Mom, I'll work it out."

Patsy's clothes went into the laundry chute. I never had to pick up after John. Maybe once- a pair of shoes. Patsy changed purses once a week. She'd lay her purse ON THE SPIRAL STAIRCASE and I'd clean it out and put it in the closet. She had maybe forty of them , and even more pairs of shoes. I think the problem with the children was they didn't have any responsibility. They were spoiled.

Burke had this red Scout knife and always whittled. He'd never use a BAG or paper to catch the shavings. He'd whittle all over the place. I asked Patsy to have a talk with him. She answered, "Well I don't know what to do other than take the knife away from him." After Thanksgiving I took that knife away from him and hid it in the cupboard just outside JonBenet's room. That's how that problem was solved.

These weren't naughty children. They dressed themselves, and Patsy did JonBenet's hair. All her daughter's clothes were organized in drawers. Turtlenecks in one drawer, pants in another, nighties and panties in one, socks in another. Dates on all their underclothes.

"Just go away and leave me alone," JonBenet said when I tried to help her with her boots. Sometimes she acted like A SPOILED BRAT.

"No, don't you answer the door," she'd say when someone went to open it at a luncheon Patsy gave. "I'm answering the door."

JonBenet spent a lot of her time sitting on her bed watching Shirley Temple movies on her VCR. She loved them all.

She also loved being in pageants. If she didn't want to go, Patsy didn't make her. Nedra used to bring lots of things for JonBenet to wear. Nedra did most of the pageant planning. JonBenet would have to practice singing and dancing. Nedra and Patsy's sister, Pam would decorate JonBenet's shoes, her gloves, put sequins on her hats. Some dresses were made from scratch, but they had fun altering most things. They prepared differently for each pageant. Sometimes it would take a month. They were always reworking something.

JonBenet played a lot with Daphne, the White's little girl. They were real close. And Burke had his friends, the Walker and Stine children. When the Ramseys traveled, I started taking the children's dog, Jacques home with me. It would always yip, yip, yip, and I couldn't take it. Joe Barnhill, the elderly neighbor from across the street started watching Jacques, and they got attached to each other. before long the dog was always running across the street to the Barnhill's house. Jacques started staying over there, and when JonBenet wanted to see her dog, she went over and played with him.

In the summer of "96, JonBenet started wearing those diaper type underpants-Pull-Ups. She even wore them to bed. There was always a wet one in the trash. By the end of the summer, Patsy was trying to get her to do without them. Then JonBenet started wetting the bed again. Almost every day I was there, there was a wet bed. Patsy said she wasn't going to use Pull-Ups again. She just put a plastic cover on the bed. No big deal to her. By the time I'd come in the morning, Patsy would have all the sheets off the bed and in the laundry. JonBenet's white blanket would already be in the dryer. The Ramseys had two washer-dryers-one in the basement and a stackable unit in a closet just outside JonBenet's room.

Patsy started taking a painting class, and JonBenet drew a lot with crayons and MARKERS. People and flowers. They had a big easel, but most of the time JonBenet painted on a card table in the butler's kitchen. Patsy had her paints and brushes in a white paint tote. Sometimes she asked me to take her paints down to the basement. "I don't want to see it." On the day of the Ramseys' Christmas party, I took the paint tote downstairs.

Evenings were for the family. They did homework and had dinner together. Patsy worked on school projects with the kids. She was always doing something for the children on her computer. She read to them at bedtime. Sometimes she asked me to baby-sit if she couldn't find a sitter. Patsy spent a lot of time ALONE in the house while John was away on business. She never kept a baseball bat under the bed, or Mace. Never even set the alarm. She didn't like it, because it went off accidently and it drove the police crazy.

The last month I was there, NOTHING WAS DIFFERENT. Patsy went to New York with her family and some friends. JonBenet even ice skated at Rockefeller Center. When they came back, they got ready for another pageant. Patsy was always putting things off until the last minute.

On December 23, JonBenet was playing with makeup.

"JonBenet, you are not going anywhere with all that on," Patsy told her. "You take some of it off." JonBenet did.

At one o'clock she went to play with some friends and was back by four o'clock. Late that afternoon she didn't want to wear a dress for their Christmas party. Patsy got a little agitated. Finally, JonBenet put on a velvet one with short sleeves.

I stuck around with my daughter Ariana to see Santa. We hadn't planned to stay, so Ariana wasn't dressed up. Patsy gave my daughter a Christmas sweater and a vest. Even lent her a pair of her shoes. At the last minute, Patsy wrote a little verse about Ariana for Santa to read.

At 5:30 P.M. Santa showed up. By then the Barnhills, the Fernies, the Stines, Pinky Barber, and the Whites, who came with Priscilla's parents, had all arrived. maybe eight couples and their children. Most of the men gathered by the spiral staircase. John made drinks for everybody from the butler's kitchen. The kids played in the livng room by the big christmas tree. That's where Santa read his litle verses about everyone. This year, Mrs. Claus was there too, Santa looked kind of sick.

I was supposed to come back the next day, December 24, and clean up. I called Patsy and said I couldn't. I told her I had a fight with my sister and needed some money to pay the rent. I asked Patsy for a $2,000 loan. I told her I would pay it back $50 each week. She didn't hesitate. "Sure." Said she'd leave it for me on the kitchen counter for my next regular visit on December 27.

The more I think about it, JonBenet could not have been killed by a stranger. I didn't even know THAT ROOM was there. How could a stranger know to go there? How in the world did this happen?

-Linda Hoffman Pugh"

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  His story
Posted by: jameson245 - 02-06-2017, 01:49 PM - Forum: Stephen Miles - No Replies

The Unusual Suspect
Thursday, February 19, 1998 at 4 a.m.
By Steve Jackson

A year ago, Boulder police chief Tom Koby faced the cameras and promised that "our guy won't walk."
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Since then, of course, the JonBenet Ramsey murder investigation has limped along. Thus far, the only arrests remotely related to the case have been that of a friend of the Ramseys who went after alleged reporters with a baseball bat; a "performance artist" who stole the morgue page referring to JonBenet and later set fire to the Ramseys' mailbox; and a former deputy sheriff and a photo-processing technician who leaked photos of the dead girl to the Globe.

While an arrest has yet to be made for JonBenet's murder, however, people touched by the crime have already gone to court to see that justice is done--at least for them.

There's no statute of limitations on murder--but there is on libel.
Last Wednesday, a Louisiana beauty pageant director filed suit against the West Monroe, Louisiana, police and assorted broadcast outlets--including American Journal, Inside Edition and Hard Copy--for linking him to the JonBenet Ramsey investigation. The fact that he'd been charged with indecent behavior with juveniles--he'd reportedly shown porn videos to two teens--was no reason to connect him with JonBenet's death, David Haynes said.
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The week before, Boulder police detective Linda Arndt had sued her employer, claiming, among other things, that the Boulder Police Department's treatment of her resulted in defaming statements being broadcast on talk radio. Arndt's $150,000 suit contends that a department gag order prevented her from defending herself--and that Chief Koby did nothing to stop the defamation. (The City of Boulder has already settled a suit filed by Sergeant Larry Mason, who sued after he was removed from the Ramsey investigation and accused of leaking information to the press.)

At least no one's accused Arndt of murdering JonBenet. The day before Arndt went to court, possibly the most unusual suspect to surface--yet--filed his own suit in Boulder District Court. On February 3, Stephen Miles, a 49-year-old Boulder photographer, filed a defamation case against the National Enquirer, two of its reporters and John Ramsey. The October 21, 1997, issue of the tabloid had trumpeted a "JonBenet bombshell" on its front page: "Dad: We Know Who Did It." Below a pouty-lipped photograph of JonBenet was a picture of Miles, along with the promise of an "exclusive interview with man Ramseys say killed JonBenet."

Enquirer reporters John South and David Wright started their story with this: "John and Patsy Ramsey expect to be arrested for the murder of their daughter, but they already have their defense strategy in place--pointing at a man they'll claim is the intruder who killed JonBenet. 'John and Patsy will claim that the real killer is a neighbor, Stephen Miles, who was once arrested and accused of a sex offense against a minor,' a source close to the couple revealed."

But another anonymous source, this one close to the Ramsey team of lawyers, denies that John Ramsey ever made such an accusation. "Over the course of time, if you look at who we've let interview John, we've been pretty damn careful," says the source. "Now I ask you: Are we going to let him go talk willy-nilly to some fucking dog biscuit at the National Enquirer?"

Nor did John Ramsey make the accusation to anyone who might have repeated it to the Enquirer, the source says.

Lee Hill, Miles's attorney and a former Boulder city council candidate (on an anti-Koby platform), counters with this: "What we know is that the Enquirer published a story saying that John Ramsey said Steve Miles killed their daughter. If John Ramsey never said that, then this is a great opportunity for him to prove that and join us in going after the Enquirer.

"This lawsuit is not an inquisition," he adds. "It's an attempt to develop the truth."

That's something that's always been in short supply in the Ramsey case.

Early in the morning the day after Christmas 1996, Patsy Ramsey made an emergency call to 911. Her six-year-old daughter was missing, and she'd found a ransom note. The supposed kidnappers wanted $118,000 and were threatening to cut off the girl's head.

Arndt was one of the first cops on the scene. Early that afternoon, she reportedly allowed John Ramsey to search the house; he found JonBenet's body in the basement. An autopsy revealed that the girl had been strangled, her skull fractured. It was possible that she'd been sexually assaulted.

Tiny beauty queen. Rich parents. Perverted murder. It had all the trappings to become the true-crime story of the decade (post-O.J.). The Globe and Enquirer raced to see who could turn up the most lurid details and make the most inflammatory accusations, and the rest of the press followed like puppies.  

As the BPD investigation bogged down, the DA's office brought in retired detective Lou Smit as a special investigator. Although the cops considered the Ramseys their prime suspects, Smit pursued the theory that an intruder had broken into the Ramsey home, stolen the girl from her bed, killed her in the basement, then taken the time to write a lengthy ransom note on a legal pad found in the home.

That's when word leaked out that the Boulder police were checking out child sex offenders. (Convicted sex offenders must register with the police when they take up residence after release from prison.) The cops had plenty to choose from: There are 71 registered child sex offenders in Boulder and another 30 in Boulder County.

But Miles, who lives with his 89-year-old mother six blocks from the Ramsey house, is not a convicted child sex offender. He has been arrested before--but for possessing photographs of teenage boys. So why go after him for the murder of a six-year-old girl?

Miles was working in the garden last October when next-door neighbor Judith Phillips came rushing over. Phillips, a photographer herself and a former friend of the Ramseys, was breathless, he says.

"She said, 'You need to come over to my house right away. It's extremely important...use the side door,'" Miles recalls. "She put her hands on my shoulders and said, 'Trust me.'"

Miles did as he was asked. Phillips led him into her darkened living room, he says, where she introduced him to a man named John South.

South told him he worked for the Enquirer. "He said, 'We've learned that the Ramsey camp is targeting you as the killer of JonBenet,'" recalls Miles, imitating South's British accent. "He said, 'They want to confuse the issue and take attention away from themselves. Can you think of any reason why they would choose you?'"

Miles told the Enquirer reporter that he had several drug arrests, the last in the late 1980s, on his record, and that he'd also been arrested for sexual exploitation of a child in 1989.

That year the Boulder police raided Miles's home and seized a number of photographs of teenage boys in various stages of undress. Because there were three copies of one particular photograph, it was considered to have been taken for commercial purposes, netting Miles the exploitation charge.

However, that photograph was of Peter Hale, a friend of Miles's and, more important, a male then seventeen years old--and therefore above the age of consent.

Like the other photographs, the Hale picture was fairly modest. "Michelangelo's sculpture of David is more revealing," notes Hill, Miles's attorney. The photograph has since appeared in several mainstream photography magazines.

The exploitation charge was dropped; however, Miles pleaded guilty to contributing to the delinquency of a minor, for supplying beer to an underage drinker. As part of the deal, he was told to report to a monastery in Pecos, New Mexico, that bills itself as a retreat/counseling center for "wounded healers," where his brother was the abbott for counseling.

Miles's therapy was geared to helping him develop "more age-appropriate relationships." He also was told to stay away from minor children and from Penny Lane, a Boulder coffeeshop/ poetry venue then known as a hangout for the young and disenfranchised.

Now here was the Enquirer's South, asking if Miles had noticed anything strange in the past few days. As a matter of fact, Miles told him, someone had stolen every bit of his trash that week, and a camper had been parked across the street for two days.

After South warned him that "this is quite serious," Miles says he assumed the theft of his trash and the camper's presence confirmed that the Ramseys were after him. South told him he had a plan. "Your story will prove they are barking up the wrong tree," Miles remembers him saying.

"Now I wonder if it wasn't the National Enquirer going through my trash, and their camper," Miles says.

The next day Phillips asked Miles to come over again--this time to take his picture for the story. At first, Miles says, Phillips said she wanted to photograph him in his garden, of which he is exceedingly proud. But then she asked him to put his hands behind his head and snapped the shot when he was unprepared.

It was that photograph of a harassed-looking Miles that ran on the front page of the Enquirer a week later.

The photograph of Miles was published again inside, along with a full-page story. "I can't believe this nightmare is happening to me," Miles was quoted as saying. "Why are they doing this to me? Are John and Patsy so cold-blooded as to try to make me the fall guy to save their own skins?"  

The article intimated that Miles knew he was on a "list of pedophile sex offenders living in Boulder." But Miles takes issue with that. "I am not a pedophile," he says. "I am gay, openly gay, and have been for years. I never said that I knew I was on a list or that the Boulder police were looking at me."

And that list can't be the registration that the police are required to keep, since Miles isn't a convicted child sex offender.

In fact, the first contact Miles had with the Boulder police regarding the Ramsey case was three weeks ago, after his lawsuit against the Ramseys and the Enquirer was filed. "My lawyer asked if I was on any sort of list, and the detective said no," Miles says. "They just asked me where I was that night, and I told them with my mom. We had Christmas dinner with relatives and then we went home...They said, 'Sorry for the inconvenience.'" But they also asked for a handwriting sample, a mouth swab and a palm print, Miles adds.

Miles also disputes the magazine's characterization of him as a drug addict. "I consider myself a recovered drug addict," he says. "I do take methadone. It's a prescription I have for pain. I have lupus and some other health problems for which I need pain medication. But I don't take it to get high."

His mother is also in bad health, and the article was hard on her. But South approached him again, Miles says, and told him, "'I know you and your mom are going through hard times' and handed me $200. He then gave me a little piece of paper to sign saying I'd received the money." Miles says he took the cash and signed.

Soon after, Miles says, South and his fellow writer, David Wright, showed up at his house. This time Wright fanned "twenty crisp $100 bills in my face," Miles recalls. "He said, 'I know that you're a little unhappy about the story, but we'd like you to sign a contract giving exclusivity...I know you and your mom can use the money.'

"He said they'd write another story 'cleaning me up' and I'd get another $2,000."

As Wright spoke, Miles says, South stood at his side whispering, "'Take the money. Take the money.' I felt like I had a little devil on my shoulder."

The money was tempting, Miles says; between his and his mother's medical bills, they have difficulty paying the mortgage. He asked for time to read the contract; they gave him half an hour. In addition to the exclusivity clause, the Enquirer wanted him to sign that the first story, including the quotes attributed to him, was accurate and that he knew that he was on a pedophile list.

Miles turned the deal down.
Soon after, a producer from Hard Copy called and asked Miles to appear on the show. He did, and was paid an amount he won't disclose, but he says on TV he got the chance to tell the truth about the Enquirer allegations.

Of all the allegations in the Enquirer piece, the one that bothers Miles most, he says, is that he's a pedophile--defined as someone who attempts sexual contact with a prepubescent child.

The pedophile label dredged up old suspicions against Miles in Boulder. Part of that sentiment, Miles believes, can be traced to his friendship with Beat poet Allen Ginsberg. Miles often photographed Ginsberg, who encouraged him to publish a photography book he had assembled of male figure studies.

One of the founders of the Jack Kerouac School of Disembodied Poetics at the Naropa Institute, Ginsberg caused consternation several years back when he came out in support of the North American-Boy Love Association. Ginsberg, who was gay, publicly defended his position as supporting NAMBLA's right to free speech. He wasn't so circumspect with friends.

Hill, Miles's attorney, also describes the poet as a "dear friend." Hill was one of Ginsberg's writing apprentices at Naropa in the late 1970s and was on a panel with him when the poet described himself as a pedophile.

"It was abhorrent to me," Hill says. And that's why, he adds, he wouldn't be working for Miles if he believed that his client was a pedophile.

Although Miles is openly gay, he says he's never attempted to develop a relationship with anyone below the age of consent. "Sometimes gay kids have come to me to talk about what they're going through," he says. "My house has been a place for kids to hang out who have nowhere else to go. And yes, there have been some parties."  

And while he concedes that he's sometimes attracted to the young males he photographs, he says he doesn't break the rules. "I've been asked by parents here, including people in the mental-health field, to take photographs of their sons," he says. "They know I'm gay, and they know about my arrest, but they're comfortable with me being around their sons. I am not some predator...I just sometimes relate better to younger people. I consider them my peers."

The Enquirer story damaged the way of life he'd worked to rebuild since his 1989 arrest, Miles says. And while he understands that no one is above suspicion in Boulder, he wonders why the magazine focused on him--particularly since there's no indication he's ever been interested in females of any age. (The Enquirer reporters did not return calls to their Boulder office. Phillips did not return Westword's call, either.)

The Ramsey legal team source says he didn't even recognize Miles's name when he saw the tabloid story. He wouldn't put it past the Enquirer to make up the "source close to the couple" in order to get Miles to jump through the hoop, he adds.

"I know Stephen Miles," says former Enquirer reporter Joe Mullins, who now covers the Ramsey case for the Globe, "and I don't believe he could hurt anyone and don't believe that anyone ever really considered him a suspect."

Hill agrees. "If you knew Steve, who's really very meek and not in the greatest health, you'd wonder why they ever chose him," Hill says. "To tell you the truth, JonBenet would have kicked Steve's ass."

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